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How to raise cats from kittens to adults

Feeding a cat when it is hungry and expecting it to mature on its own is not how to raise a cat.
Knowing what your kittens consume will help you choose the correct diet so they may grow and develop normally. The type and quantity of food will vary depending on the stage of growth. For the finest information on cat care, see the article ” How to raise cats from kittens to adults” below from website wtonlinepetsupplies.com

To feed your cat well—really well—requires a little bit of planning on your part.

You will discover how to properly fuel your cat from the time he is a young kitten until he enters his golden years in our feeding guide for cats. You will learn how much food to give your cat at various times of his life, how many meals he needs each day, and the sorts of food that are the healthiest for him to eat.

We have broken down the nutritional requirements of your cat into age-specific categories, providing you with a road map for providing healthy food at every stage of your cat’s life.

Your Cat’s Dietary Needs Evolve Over Time.

Your cat’s dietary requirements will shift as he matures from a kitten to a young adult and beyond. To achieve and maintain excellent health, it is necessary to fulfill those standards throughout one’s whole life.

Your first port of call when selecting the appropriate diet for your feline friend? The declaration about the nutritional sufficiency.

This remark, which may often be seen on the back of the package or can, shows whether or not the food is nutritionally full and balanced for the stage of life it is designed for. On the label, for instance, it will say that the food has been “…formulated to satisfy the nutritional standards set by the cat food nutrient profiles for all life stages.”

Foods that aren’t nutritionally full and balanced are often labeled “for supplementary feeding only,” since this is the only appropriate way to consume them. These foods should not be your cat’s only source of nutrition since they do not include a suitable mix of macronutrients (protein, fat, and carbs) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals).

Check out the feeding directions at the same time as you are looking at the label. The necessary feeding guidelines for the typical home cat are often already included on the box of the cat food.

The nutritional standards that are printed on the packaging will steer you in the right direction; nevertheless, you may need to make some adjustments to ensure that the food you give your cat meets all of its specific requirements.

Here’s A Guide On How To Feed Your Cat During The Different Phases Of His Life

Newborn Kitten,  Age: 0-4 weeks

The majority of kittens have all of their nutritional needs met by their mother’s milk at this period of development. If the kittens’ mother is still around, you won’t have to worry about feeding them at all since they will know how to do it on their own. Having said that, if you’ve managed to save an orphaned kitten, you’ll have to feed him using a bottle. To provide them with an equivalent source of nourishment to that which is contained in their mother’s milk, kittens need to be fed kitten milk replacer. Do not give a kitten cow’s milk since it does not contain the appropriate nutritional balance to sustain a newborn kitten. Cow’s milk should not be given to a kitten.

How Much Should You Feed Your Newborn Kitten?

If the mother of your kitten is nearby and able to breastfeed, he will do so without hesitation. If you plan on feeding your kitten with a bottle, be sure to follow the directions on the packet of kitten milk replacer. The general rule of thumb is to provide around 2 tablespoons of liquid kitten formula for every 4 ounces of the animal’s body weight.

How Often Should You Feed Your Newborn Kitten?

Kittens that have just been born eat rather often, typically nursing once every 1–2 hours. When you are feeding your kitten with a bottle, follow this same feeding pattern. When your kitten is three weeks old, progressively reduce the number of times per day that it is fed to between four and six feedings.

4-8 Weeks Old Kitten

Around the fourth week of their lives, kittens start the process of weaning from their mother’s milk. During this period, they will begin making the transition gradually from a diet consisting of milk or formula to one consisting of solid foods, which will provide them with the protein, fatty acids, and nutrients that are necessary for their early growth.

Bottle feeders may begin gradually switching their kitten to a diet of watered-down kitten food at the age of 4.5 weeks, when the cat is around 4 weeks old. Start by substituting part of his regular meals with a loose slurry of wet kitten food and kitten formula in a bottle, and then start feeding your cat from a dish gradually over time.

How Much Should You Feed Your 4-8-week-old Kitten?

Your new kitten is in the middle of a strong growth spurt and requires around three times as many calories per pound as an adult does. There are around 60 calories required for every pound of your kitten’s bodyweight.

How Often Should You Feed Your 4-8-week-old Kitten?

Your newborn kitten probably ate every one to four hours, but after they reach the age of four weeks, they may spend as long as six to eight hours without eating. Even though it has a tiny stomach, your kitten still has to eat somewhat often in order to meet its high energy requirements.

8-16 Weeks Old Kitten

At this fascinating period of growth, your kitten’s personality is evolving, and he is becoming more predatory in character. By the time he is 8 to 10 weeks old, he should be completely weaned and consuming a meat-based kitten food that provides an adequate amount of protein, animal-derived fatty acids that are beneficial to the development of the brain and eyes, and the appropriate quantities of vitamins and minerals.

How Much Should You Feed Your 8-16-week-old Kitten?

Your kitten is going through a period of fast development and needs a large amount of calories to sustain its growth during this stage. Kittens that are still growing have an average daily calorie need of between 250 and 280, but adult cats of bigger breeds, such as Maine Coons and Ragdolls, need as much as 360 calories.

How Often Should You Feed Your 8-16-Week-Old Kitten?

The recommended number of meals for a kitten is five, however after they reach 8 weeks of age, they may begin free feeding on dry food. When free-feeding, use extreme caution. Even though your kitten should be putting on weight at this period, giving it an excessive amount of dry food might cause it to put on too much.

4-6 Months Old Kitten

Your kitten will begin to establish his regular eating habits at this period of his development. Because of this, it is really important to make sure that you are developing healthy behaviors that you may carry into adulthood. By providing him with a variety diet, you may prevent your kitten from developing a picky eating habit and keep his mind occupied. It is important to keep in mind that kittens that consume dry food at this age are more prone to develop an addiction to the crunch of dry food and may develop an aversion to eating wet food as they become older.

Dry food typically has less carbohydrates, fewer species-appropriate animal-based proteins, and a lower moisture level than wet or canned food, which often has a greater moisture content (70-80 percent) than dry food (6-10 percent ).

How Much Should You Feed Your 4-6-Month-Old Kitten?

Kittens still need almost twice as many calories per pound as adult cats do at this point in their development. You may calculate how much food to give your kitten per pound of his bodyweight by consulting the feeding recommendations that are printed on the food’s packaging.

Kittens at this age have a daily calorie requirement of around 60–65 calories per pound of body weight. For instance, a kitten that weighs 5 pounds needs ingest around 325 calories per day.

How Often Should You Feed Your 4-6-Month-Old Kitten?

At the age of four weeks, a kitten will need around five tiny meals per day; however, by the time he is six months old, you may decrease his daily feedings to two or three meals per day. You may also offer your cat snacks at various points throughout the day, but the calories from the treats shouldn’t make up more than 5–10 percent of the total daily caloric intake.

6 Months-Adult Cats

Older kittens still need a significant amount of calories to fuel their continued development; but, as they age, their metabolism will begin to progressively slow down, and their nutritional requirements will begin to resemble those of an adult more and more.

When your kitten is about to become one year old, you should begin the process of switching him over to an adult diet and stop feeding him kitten food. Be aware, however, that cats of bigger breeds may continue to develop until they are between 3 and 4 years old and may thus continue to consume a food that is geared toward growth.

How Much Should You Feed Your Adult Cat?

When your young cat becomes an adult, his metabolism will naturally begin to slow down, and you may notice that he begins to gain extra weight around this time. It’s very uncommon for adult cats to struggle with obesity, which, if the problem isn’t addressed early on, may result in health problems in later years. Maintaining a healthy weight and body condition in your cat may be accomplished by preventing obesity by regular exercise and maintaining dietary management.

It is essential to ensure that your cat consumes the appropriate quantity of food each day, regardless of whether you give him homemade cat food or the finest commercial cat meals. However, there is no one certain quantity of food that every cat should consume on a daily basis.

It’s impossible to generalize about a cat’s calorie requirements since there are so many variables at play. When determining how much food to give your cat, you need to take into account a variety of factors, including his breed, age, reproductive status, underlying health concerns, and more. In general, the recommended daily caloric intake is around 20 calories per pound of bodyweight; however, there are exceptions to this rule.

How Often Should You Feed Your Adult Cat?

When your cat is at least six months old, you should start offering him two or three meals a day.

Senior Years

Senior cats have certain dietary requirements that differ from those of younger and middle-aged individuals. They often have a decreased capacity to digest protein, and as a result, they frequently experience a loss of muscle mass.

To maintain their health and lean muscle mass, they need a higher amount of protein that is digestible. Omega-3 fatty acids are a very useful supplement to include in the diet of an older cat because of the increased risk of arthritis and other inflammatory disorders that may occur in cats of this age.

Wet or moist food is preferable for older cats because of the increased likelihood that they would have trouble eating due to dental issues.

How Much Should You Feed Your Senior Cat?

Cats that are middle-aged or older have a higher calorie need per pound of bodyweight. If you are concerned that your elderly loved one is losing muscle mass, you may want to try boosting his calorie intake to between 30 and 40 calories per pound. The vast majority of those calories need to be from proteins derived from animals, since this aids to stave off sarcopenia (loss of muscle due to aging).

How Often Should You Feed Your Senior Cat?

Maintain a feeding schedule of two to three meals each day for your senior cat.

Cat Feeding Chart

Age Close Approximation of Weight Quantity to be Fed Schedule
0-1 week 50–150 grams (1.7–5.2 ounces), about 2-6 ml kitten formula Every 1 to 2 hours
1-2 weeks between 150 and 250 grams (or 5.2 and 8.8 ounces) 6-10 ml kitten formula between once every 1 and 2 hours
2-3 weeks 250-350 grams, or 8.8-12.4 ounces about 10-14 ml kitten formula Once every two to three hours.
3-4 weeks 350-450 grams, or 12.4-15.9 ounces about 14-18 ml kitten formula Once every three to four hours.
4-5 weeks 450-550 grams, which is equivalent to 15.9 to 1.1 pounds Starting the weaning phase, provide 18-22 ml kitten formula; gradually move to a blend of kitten formula / wet kitten food Once every four to six hours.
5-8 weeks 550-850 grams, which is equivalent to 1.1-1.5 pounds During the weaning process, provide an unrestricted supply of moist kitten food. Each and every 6 hours
8-9 weeks between 1.5 and 2.6 pounds 250-360 calories per day Approximately every 6 to 8 hours
9-10 weeks between 1.6 and 2.9 pounds 250-360 calories per day Approximately every 6 to 8 hours
10-11 weeks between 1.8 and 3.1 pounds 250-360 calories per day Approximately every 6 to 8 hours
11-12 weeks between 2 and 3.3 pounds 250-360 calories per day Approximately every 6 to 8 hours
12-13 weeks between 2.2 and 4 pounds 250-360 calories per day Approximately every 6 to 8 hours
13-14 weeks 3 to 4.5 kg 250-360 calories per day Approximately every 6 to 8 hours
14-15 weeks between 3.5 and 5 pounds 250-360 calories per day Approximately every 6 to 8 hours
15-16 weeks between 4 and 5.5 pounds 250-360 calories per day Approximately every 6 to 8 hours
Four months between 4 and 5.5 pounds 60-65 calories daily for every pound of bodyweight Each and every 8 hours
Five months between 5.1 and 6 pounds 60-65 calories daily for every pound of bodyweight Each and every 8 hours
Half a year 5.50 to 6.50 kg 60-65 calories daily for every pound of bodyweight between every 8 and 12 hours.
Seven months 6-to-7 kg 60-65 calories daily for every pound of bodyweight between every 8 and 12 hours.
Eight months about 6.5 and 7.5 pounds 60-65 calories daily for every pound of bodyweight between every 8 and 12 hours.
Nine months. 7 to 8 kg 60-65 calories daily for every pound of bodyweight between every 8 and 12 hours.
10-month span 7 1/2 to 8 1/2 pounds 60-65 calories daily for every pound of bodyweight between every 8 and 12 hours.
Eleven months 8 to 9 kg 60-65 calories daily for every pound of bodyweight between every 8 and 12 hours.
Twelve months 7.5 to 9.5 kg 60-65 calories daily for every pound of bodyweight between every 8 and 12 hours.

Final Thoughts

Your cat has a thirst just like you do!

In addition to following the appropriate diet, it is essential to ensure that a cat has access to clean water at all times. Constipation and disorders of the urinary system, such as urinary tract infections and blockages, may both be avoided with enough water intake, which also helps to prevent constipation.

Regardless of whether your feline companion prefers dry or wet food, it is essential that they have access to clean water at all times.

Finally, you should think about asking your veterinarian for more guidance.

Here are some tips to assist you care for your kitten in the most efficient manner possible. You feel prepared to care for a gorgeous cat now that you have had the experience of feeding kittens.

Michael Hogan

San Gabriel Valley California Bird Seed Delivery. Huge selection of Pet and Wild Seed & Food. Free delivery. Pick up option also avaulable.

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